LOOT

#1
Sica and Valkis cautiously entered the large chamber. A tall cylinder filled with a sparkling blue fluid dominated the centre; it was surrounded by smaller machines and other assorted items. Suddenly, a distant shout came from behind them

‘They’ve discovered that we are gone’

‘Grab some stuff and let’s get out of here’

They hurriedly scooped some items into their explorer’s packs and beat a hasty retreat before the Red Guards caught them.

Later, safely back in their room, they examined their loot.

‘We’ve got shins totalling about 180 and I think these two things might be cyphers.’

‘Here, let me have a look …’

For some time, Ben and I have been using a loot token system in our Games. Basically, instead of saying “you find 250 gold pieces and 500 silver pieces”, we just chuck (x) Loot tokens in the pot.

Later, when they are resting or back in their dwellings; they can examine the Loot and evaluate what its value is. This involves rolling on a Loot table.

This is the one we use for 13th Age.

  1. Useless stuff, Fools gold, worthless crystal etc.
  2. Useless stuff, Fools gold, worthless crystal etc.
  3. One potion of PC tier
  4. One oil of PC tier
  5. One rune of PC tier
  6. One potion, oil or rune of PC tier
  7. One potion, oil or rune of PC tier
  8. Two potions, oils or runes of PC tier
  9. Two potions, oils or runes of PC tier
  10. 25 gold pieces
  11. 25 gold pieces
  12. 50 gold pieces
  13. 100 gold pieces
  14. Gold pieces as per PC tier
  15. Gold pieces as per PC tier
  16. Gold pieces as per PC tier
  17. Three potions, oils or runes of PC tier
  18. Three potions, oils or runes of PC tier
  19. Minor magic item
  20. Minor magic item

PC Tier/ Gold Pieces

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

100 125 175 210 250 325 425 500 650 850

Ok, there is a 10% chance of coming out with something useless, this reflects that usually at the time you didn’t have chance to look carefully

e.g in “Raiders”, Indy grabs some smaller items that he later tries to sell to Brody. He didn’t examine each one in detail at the time to see what they were worth.

In Numenera this actually works better, because shins and cyphers are not always recognisable for what they are.

This is the Numenera table.

  1. Nothing, it is worthless
  2. An Oddity (roll or assigned by GM)
  3. 10 shins
  4. 15 shins
  5. 20 shins
  6. 20 shins
  7. 25 shins
  8. 50 shins
  9. Roll on Cypher table
  10. Roll on Cypher table

Cypher table

  1. Nothing, just useless junk (worth 1 shin)
  2. Roll a Cypher (or GM assigns)
  3. Roll a Cypher (or GM assigns)
  4. Roll a Cypher (or GM assigns)
  5. Roll two Cyphers (or GM assigns)
  6. Connectable Cypher (1 of 3)*

* A Connectable Cypher can be joined with two others to make an artefact; something we introduced before Destiny complicated the issue.

Tokens

We use “Pirates Treasure”, which I found being sold in The Shell Shop, Newquay Wales. For £2.99 I got a mixed bag of coins, Chinese coins, gem stones etc.

It sounds a bit random and arbitrary, but the HOG really enjoy the gamble of rolling on the Loot table to see what they get. The treasure tokens add a nice visual element.

Artefacts and True Magic items are always hand-set according to the adventure.

Continue reading...
 
Top