[generic] Second Hand Charity RPGS

Guvnor

The Guvnor
Staff member
#1
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#2
If it's an upside, you get 12% off at the moment. Interesting selection—wild pricing. However, the very good condition DragonQuest adventure was good enough for me at £10 (-12%), so they have a sale. Thanks for the link!
 
#3
The sales team at Oxfam must have been getting some consultants helping price these items at scarcity rates instead of original purchase prices.

That "Player's Handbook II" for D&D3.5 is way too expensive at 65 quid. I purchased a premium edition of the core book at way less.
 
#6
These charity shops have gone full on Capitalist these days, even with books I would presume are donated freely to them.
Once a book is out of production and scarce, the charity shops no longer seem to sell them at original costs, but instead at the inflated scarcity costs.

Checkout what happened to Rogue Trader: Into the Storm trending at over 200 quid. Running my Rogue Trader Campaign, when one of my Players asked to borrow my copy for the week I had to say "sorry, good sir, but absolutely not".
world_of_books_rogue_trader_into_the_storm.jpg
 
#7
Once a book is out of production and scarce, the charity shops no longer seem to sell them at original costs, but instead at the inflated scarcity costs.
World of Books is a second-hand book retailer rather a charity store, so they price for acquisition - i.e., if you see a book for hundreds it isn't necessarily their evaluation but the price that arises when you bookmark a recently out of stock book on Amazon or otherwise but don't want to put it out of stock. They could get the book for much less; the big price is there until they do. Amazon and others lead to all kind of randomly generated numbers as competitors stock to challenge one another and auto-monitor fluctuations in price to remain competitive.

That aside, charity shops are not the only culprit. Have you been to a convention Bring n Buy recently? You can see the difference between people who want to get rid of their books, people who don't want to get rid of anything but want to see what they might get, and those too lazy to eBay or do any research. Charity shops tend to have non-expert pricing staff who do a quick search on eBay and Amazon, then price to the first thing they see --- which goes terribly wrong when the secondhand book retailers have gone to bookmark / auto-competitor undercut mode.
 
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