Ravenloft Some key pointers

Dom

Administrator
Staff member
#1
Curse of Strahd is a sandbox adventure, built for levels 1 to 10. Experience is gained by completing quests (effectively); that's visiting certain locations and completing certain events. The adventure is scaled to start at third level for the main plot line. That is the reason I'm running the Beast of Graenseskov as an opener to give you a chance to become more effective.

So remember:
  • You can go anywhere and try anything
  • If you end up in an area scaled for much higher levels, do not be afraid to run away (sorry, disengage). Live to fight another day.
  • The Dark Powers are close, and friends lacking and needed.
  • When you arrive, you have no true place of sanctuary.
  • Magical items are rare and often tainted
  • Strahd is the Land. The Land is Strahd.
Play smart, be careful. Check for shadows in the mirrors.
 

Dom

Administrator
Staff member
#3
Do you mean this?
Pressing on vs. a campaign loss p187: Normally, the party gets to take a full heal-up after about four battles. The point of the four- battle heal-up rule is to make players want to press on instead of holing up, which is what the traditional rules reward you for.
So what happens when the party has been weakened so badly that it would be madness and suicide to press on? If the party decides to heal-up ahead of time, assuming they are able to rest, they suffer a “campaign loss” (per page 166 in Chapter 5).

Flee p166
Fleeing is a party action rather than an individual action. At any point, on any PC’s turn, any player can propose that the fight is going so badly that the characters have to flee. If all of the other players agree, the heroes beat a hasty and successful retreat, carrying any fallen heroes away with them. In exchange for this extraordinarily generous retreating rule, the party suffers a campaign loss. At the GM’s discretion, something that the party was trying to do fails in a way that going back and finishing off those enemies later won’t fix. If the heroes were on their way to rescue a captive from unholy sacrifice, then naturally enough the captive gets sacrificed. Don’t worry, overcoming setbacks is exactly what heroism is about. The point of this rule is to encourage daring attacks and to make retreating interesting on the level of story rather than tactics.
Note that this option is available at the GM’s discretion. Some GM’s don’t allow fleeing in general, while others put limits on it.
What does that mean? At your discretion, the situation in the campaign gets noticeably worse for the party. Ideally, the campaign loss can be traced to the decision to take the heal-up. For example, maybe it turns out that someone in the party knows a forbidden prayer to the Diabolist that a desperate mortal can say to gain healing. The party gets a heal-up, but the Diabolist gets . . . something. It might also simply be that taking time to rest gives an advantage to the characters’ enemies. The campaign-loss rule is key to making combat meaningful. We all know most GMs probably won’t kill the PCs permanently, but if the PCs can’t fight their way through four battles, the game world suffers.
 

Dom

Administrator
Staff member
#7
Well, if you run away, there's good chance you'd make it. I don't tend to TPK that often. And clearly, running away will have the sandbox continue, it doesn't freeze in time. So yes, effectively.
 
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