[shopping] Temptation waits... what are you resisting?

Tim, There was no setting with the original three book set. Dave Arneson's campaign was set in Blackmoor and IIRC was released in c1975 after Greyhawk, Gary's setting
 
Tim, There was no setting with the original three book set. Dave Arneson's campaign was set in Blackmoor and IIRC was released in c1975 after Greyhawk, Gary's setting
And later retro-fitted into the Mystara/Known World setting for D&D, as a forgotten past, in the DA module series.
 

Guvnor

The Guvnor
Staff member
So I stumbled upon Dave Arneson's Blackmoor Campaign Setting, but it is pretty expensive. I do not know if I should plunge or now?
It is being challenged for my wallet by Kevin Kulp's Timewatch, a Kickstarter I backed only at the PDF level, since it is Gumshoe, not my favorite system. But Timewatch has a nice quirky concept of time travel built into the simple d6 mechanics of traditional Gumshoe. Choices, choices...

View attachment 1616
No you do not need it.
 

Guvnor

The Guvnor
Staff member
Tim, There was no setting with the original three book set. Dave Arneson's campaign was set in Blackmoor and IIRC was released in c1975 after Greyhawk, Gary's setting
However, from recent archives and memoirs it looks increasingly like the Blackmoor campaign long preceded Greyhawk which was Gygax reinterpretation of a Braunstein game Arneson ran which became D&D. T├ękumel was some kind of independent Braunstein-like story telling game long before D&D as well.

What is Braunstein, u ask?
Well it's probably where our hobby comes from.
 
Tim, There was no setting with the original three book set. Dave Arneson's campaign was set in Blackmoor and IIRC was released in c1975 after Greyhawk, Gary's setting
Ta. Of course D&D has never had a setting, apart from the rules-implied one. This is one of the reasons why it may not be an rpg. :p
 
Here is yet another D&D 5th Edition Kickstarter, "Beowulf: Age of Heroes".

And its unique selling point is that it is built entirely on solo play with a GM (so maybe call it two player RPG).

The beautiful thing about 5th Edition Dungeons and Dragons is that like the d20 OGL of the 3rd Edition, the current edition is inspiring so many Third Party Publishers to use the D&D 5e SRD as the primary game engine to power so many third party products.

Sadly, I am already heavily invested in Trudvang Advnetures D&D5e Kickstarter (its last day tonight), so this Beowulf may have to be admired from a distance only. Or maybe not.

beowulf_solo_adventures_for_dnd5e.jpg
 
And, Hell, I did not resist for long. I backed at a low tier and may upgrade if I get money before the month ends, else will upgrade in Pledge Manager or Backerkit when they charge shipping. British folk too, from Falkirk.
 

Dom

Administrator
Staff member
And, Hell, I did not resist for long. I backed at a low tier and may upgrade if I get money before the month ends, else will upgrade in Pledge Manager or Backerkit when they charge shipping. British folk too, from Falkirk.
They're doing a||state as well. Paul Bourne was one of the original team.
 
Whenever I see a third party product powered by 5e it's an instant turn off.

Not that 5e is bad per se, I assume they've just made lazy choices geared towards a market that doesn't really like to try new things.
There was non-D&D Trudvang Chronicles Kickstarter, I believe built on a RuneQuest type engine, so I guess the creators only shifted focus to D&D 5e after listening to demands by fans of Trudvang who wanted a game engine much better understood and played by millions.
 
There was non-D&D Trudvang Chronicles Kickstarter, I believe built on a RuneQuest type engine, so I guess the creators only shifted focus to D&D 5e after listening to demands by fans of Trudvang who wanted a game engine much better understood and played by millions.
I totally understand the commercial reasons why, I've got the original and the system isn't particularly inspirational, but my point still stands. The game isn't strong enough to stand on its own, so it's being retooled for the 5e market, i.e. for people who might want to try a sauce or sprinkles on their vanilla but don't want to go mad and try a completely different flavour.

Edit: PS my rude tone is slightly tongue in cheek ;)
 
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I totally understand the commercial reasons why, I've got the original and the system isn't particularly inspirational, but my point still stands. The game isn't strong enough to stand on its own, so it's being retooled for the 5e market, i.e. for people who might want to try a sauce or sprinkles on their vanilla but don't want to go mad and try a completely different flavour.

Edit: PS my rude tone is slightly tongue in cheek ;)
Yes, your point is valid. And yet, the artwork and the lore in the Trudvang Adentures preview that I have been perusing convinced me it offers so much more value than just the routine D&D 5th Edition tropes you get from Critical Role's Wildermount Campaign Setting.

With the many RPG books people like myself purchase to GM at conventions and for friends, I too prefer working within one of the game engines I already know, namely D&D 5e SRD and its older sibling, the d20 SRD (of D&D3.5 and Pathfinder fame), and Shane Hensley's revamped Savage Worlds Adventure Edition.

I also still make use of the d100 of the 1st Warhammer Fantasy Role Play and its 4th edition revival (including those old Warhammer 40K RPGs), and obviously, the latest darling d6 Year Zero Engine (YZE) by Fria Ligan and even Modiphius' 2d20 game engine.

New radical RPG design is great and all that, but many times people rather just start playing immediately instead of learning new rules mechanics, which they usually forget by the time they encounter that unique RPG again, unless they play it regularly.
 
Another big risk with using new unknown game engine is that the return on investment is not there.

A beautiful German game, Degenesis, all but died, that the creators offer it free online now, just to keep it alive. It is such a waste if it vanished from RPG history. Great immersive lore, wonderful design and good layout, colour contrasts, and even a genre not properly covered by D&D 5e, and yet, because its rules are not pick-up-and-play, probably, it failed to gain any significant traction.

degenesis_sample.jpg
 
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