[generic] Two words I really dislike

Guvnor

The Guvnor
Staff member
#1
Go on, join in.
Two word concepts or even mini phrases I really dislike.

"Value Engineering", when a bunch of price watching uncreatives destroy another's vision and purpose in the pursuit of short term penny pinching....
 

MartinP

Rune Priest
#3
Good enough.

The point where management is reasonably sure no-one is going to die or sue over the obvious faults you've left in the product.

As an ex manager, I no longer need to have any ambivalence towards 'good enough', and I can just despise it. Well, that's the theory.
 

ltd

Rune Priest
#7
"Best Value" and "Continuous Improvement".

Working in local government legal/procurement, these are just a bad joke in the context of what really goes on. Sometimes getting a supplier who's half-way competent is a victory of sorts.
 

Maddz

Rune Priest
#8
"Best Value" and "Continuous Improvement".

Working in local government legal/procurement, these are just a bad joke in the context of what really goes on. Sometimes getting a supplier who's half-way competent is a victory of sorts.
Tell me about it. I do data extracts from the social care systems, and frankly in some areas it's not fit for purpose. I suspect it's because the people signing off the purchase are not particularly IT literate, don't understand how easy it is for frontline staff to misuse it and haven't a clue about what is needed to build reports.

Salesperson: "You don't need any report developers - the system has built-in reports which can be run by any user at the touch of a button"

Management: "Ooh, shiny, and we can save on salaries because we don't need reporting specialists"

6 months after the system has been installed...

Managers: "Hey performance people, why are the reports only showing half the people we expect to see?"

"Performance people: "How do we know, our reporting specialists got made redundant and the last left a week ago. Besides, we're not allowed to touch the backend universe anymore so we can't fix things even if we do find out what's gone wrong."

Supplier support desk: "Okay, you say you're not seeing people in the reports you expect to see."

A week later...

Salesperson: "To fix the issue is bespoke development as you're not following our best practice or using our forms. That will be ££££."
 

ltd

Rune Priest
#9
All that Maddz. Plus some clients have a propensity to skew their evaluation schemes so they always buy from the lowest bidder. They're the ones you can usually count on having to re-open the file three months down the line as there's a dispute with the supplier down to poor performance. They never seem to learn.

Never mind the quality, feel the width - something like that anyway.
 

ltd

Rune Priest
#12
Human Resources.
At the risk of invoking Godwin's Law, that one always gives me nightmarish visions of the Nazis turning people into soap, or using their hair to make socks. An incredibly crass expression I think - even the best interpretation reduces people to being just another factor of production, although possibly that's the idea?
 

Maddz

Rune Priest
#13
There's two words I have come to loathe over my professional and academic lives: "lowest tender"! :LOL:

You pay for crap, you get crap. Every. Time.
Or in my case, "Garbage in, garbage out". Data quality is something for other people to worry about in the case of whoever has input the data. ("Not my problem" is the usual response when called out on it.)
 
#15
In Japanese you have: "tsundoku sensei"

Apologies for the many quotation marks, but I am translating from Japanese here. ;-)

The phrase 'tsundoku sensei' appears in text from 1879 according to the writer Mori Senzo," Prof. Gerstle explained. "Which is likely to be satirical, about a teacher who has lots of books but doesn't read them.
The word "tsundoku" itself is make up of two parts with the first part being the word "doku" which can be used as a verb to mean "reading". According to Prof. Gerstle, the "tsun" in "tsundoku" originates in "tsumu" - a word meaning "to pile up".

Honestly, the Japanese language is truly rich in perfectly descriptive words and phrases.


tsundoku_japense_for_letting_books_pile_up_without_reading.png
 
#16
"Zero tolerance"

Luckily it seems to have gone out of fashion. But a few years ago it was stated as a solution to everything but:

1) was never implemented. Not even close.
2) was based on a theory that didn't work. (Was completely dismantled in a book called "Freakonomics" which I recommend - but most of you have probably already read years ago.)
 

Dom

Administrator
Staff member
#18
At the risk of invoking Godwin's Law, that one always gives me nightmarish visions of the Nazis turning people into soap, or using their hair to make socks. An incredibly crass expression I think - even the best interpretation reduces people to being just another factor of production, although possibly that's the idea?
I think that is, indeed, the idea. And then you can skim on maintenance and improvements to save money.

I knew that my time in Unilever had to come to an end when the HR team (now led by someone from the US and with most transactions done via a web portal) started to refer to 'blue' and 'white' collar staff. Lord Leverhulme would be turning in his grave.
 

ltd

Rune Priest
#19
And then you can skim on maintenance and improvements to save money.
A former employer of mine was/is notorious for this. They've just bought themselves a £4.2m shopping arcade, what could possibly go wrong?

Meanwhile, the ceiling of the old town hall fell in the other day due to lack of maintenance. Nobody injured fortunately, so made oi larf it did!
 
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