[D&D] What is the necromancers crime?

#21
Now take that emotional attachment and dial it up to 11 for the actual body of the person you loved. The hands you held, the lips you kissed, the freckles on the nose you thought were cute.

@Stronty Girl that is heart breaking. I’m a vaguely related aside, I’m currently reading an anthropological text on violent crowd behaviour which is horrific “Among the Thugs” and it’s making me realise how much we distance ourselves from reality in games. I’m not a fan of in game gratuitous violence but the book made me question even more the ability people have to disassociate what they do or see in a game from what this would be in reality. Your loved-one zombie is a great example as I imagine any real thought about applications in reality might make some games stomach churning. Until now I just thought zombies LOL funny characters, and that was it.
 
#22
There is no biological restriction on eating living flesh, the gastric juices work the same. Unless whatever made them a zombie makes you a zombie I suppose. Also I’d have to assume all their bacteria and viruses would be reanimated, unless the reanimation were performed by a microbiologically trained necromancer that could discern bad bacteria from commensurate bacteria. So you’d have to cook the zombie really well and then hope it works as a single entity and not as a cellular colony, in which case its roasted reanimated and rotting prions will try to cross your blood brain barrier 🧠
 
#23
What are the pre-D&D sources for the raising of the undead, particularly the mindless types? Animated corpses as the result of pervasive magic or “evil” seem perhaps more common (but my knowledge of the roots of fantasy/fantastical literature is very limited!)

I wonder if much of the particular views of necromancy and necromancers stems from how it was portrayed in early D&D. In which case it’s evil because Gygax said so, and - at least in some editions - tied that magic directly to cosmic negative/evil forces and energy.
 
#24
What are the pre-D&D sources for the raising of the undead, particularly the mindless types? Animated corpses as the result of pervasive magic or “evil” seem perhaps more common (but my knowledge of the roots of fantasy/fantastical literature is very limited!)
There are a number (a lot?) of real world folk tales of dead bodies being brought back to life as either slaves (the voodoo style drugged and buried stories) or just ravening killing beasts (normally targeted at someone the magician doesn't like). I recall having a book all about it as a kid, although the details are long gone. Eastern Europe, Africa and Asia all have a variety of undead nasties in their folk lore.

Hopefully someone who has researched this recently will be along in a minute or two...
 
#25
Hmm... planting the dragon's teeth and having warriors spring from the ground in ancient Greek myth is my first thought. In most versions the warriors seem fully formed and human, but the Harryhausen film had them as skeletal fighters, and there's a version that's consistent with too.
 
#30
In our 13th Age campaign, I played (in the most special snowflake style) a pale Drow who was a 'good' necromancer. I know, I know... One Unique Thing, OK?

The way we managed this was to do with necromantic redemption. In a fantasy world where death comes quickly and violence is an everyday happening, when many people die their karmic scales aren't always balanced. So when I summoned the undead to do my bidding, I was offering them a deal. Do this one last task for me, almost certainly messing with the antics of the Lich King, and you can ascend to your 'higher place'

I took the power that had undead exploding on death, to represent their holy conclusion and it worked perfectly. I was a necromancer, but I was one that sent souls to their final resting place, rescuing them from their personal purgatory.

And this meant people were only a tiny weeny bit uneasy around me, rather than coming at me with pitchforks and firebrands
 
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